C.K.

My poem today is supposed to be an elegy, “a poem that mourns or honors someone dead or something gone by”. This was difficult for me as it caused sadness to fill me for a bit. I almost skipped this one, but I decided to write it anyway last minute.

This is dedicated to a mentor who inspired many to follow Christ.

I’m following the challenge here:¬†http://www.napowrimo.net/day-three-3/

C.K.

You always had
a way of calming even the
loudest doubt
inside of us
kids.

With your golden yellow
visor with the black “WC”
in the middle of the front,
you screamed,
“Hawk time!”
It was your chant
of life,
your simple, loving
way that you guided
youth
towards Christ
that made you hard
to let go.

I remember
when I babysat your kids
how I came over early
in the morning
to find you
cuddled up among
the dangling body
of your preteen son.
You were the biggest
teddy bear,
no one else could
compare to your steady grace
and faith.

And one of my greatest memories
with you
will always be
singing “Cotton-Eyed Joe”
at the top of our lungs,
on our youth trip.
The way you sung
a little off-key
made me smile.

When you died
I was supposed to be comforting
your brother,
but I ended up bawling
into his arms,
for the loss of you
was so unexpected
and so hard to grasp.

A part of my childhood
died the day
that I realized I would
never see you again.

Did you really meet
Christ
up there in heaven?
Are you with Him now,
where no one needs
the weapons of spiritual warfare?
For there is peace where you are,
life eternal in Him.
You taught us so much about
letting go of the scars,
and working hard
to continue a relationship
with the Father.

“Excuses are the crutches of the uncommitted”
is a phrase I will never forget.
You taught us to never give up
and never to quit.
Your legacy lives on
through the countless youth
that you touched with
God’s love
and unchanging grace.
And one day I hope
to see you again,
after I see the Creator’s face.